Slow Food Worried about Newly Adopted Decisions on Marine Environments

This week in Brussels, Belgium and Dubrovnik, Croatia, two decisions were made, which will cause great concern for the future of the sea and fish populations. On Monday, EU ministers of agriculture and fisheries decided on catch limits for economically relevant deep-sea fish stocks for 2019 and 2020, while the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) increased the authorized catch quotas of bluefin tuna by 20%. Slow Food is concerned that by favoring the interests of various players in the market, marine ecosystems are put at risk.

Slow Food joins Organizations Calling on the European Ombudsman to Assess Actions of the European Commission in the case of electric fishing

Slow Food has joined 30 civil society groups calling on the European Commission to ultimately stop electric fishing. Despite being banned in the EU, this fishing method is still practiced in Europe, with one of the most notable cases of the Netherlands. The research, carried out by Bloom association, reveals the extent of lobbying and the public subsidies granted to industrial electric trawlers, going against public interest and regulatory framework. The results of the research were disclosed today at the press conference in the European Parliament.