The Game of Interests: ‘Innovation Principle’ Favors Industry but Undermines EU Laws Ensuring Healthy and Safe Food

Shortly before the Council of the European Union announces its position on the Horizon Europe research and innovation program, Slow Food Europe urges decision-makers to support an amendment, asking to leave the precautionary principle as the default (and only) principle in the new Horizon program. Slow Food Europe is among the organizations raising concerns over the so-called ‘innovation principle’ which has been included in the new program. This principle, coined by industry lobbyist groups in 2013 at the European Risk Forum, could undermine EU laws on chemicals, novel foods, pesticides, and research concerning genetically modified organisms (GMO) and new breeding technologies (NBTs). The European Commission’s Horizon Europe program for 2021-2028 will replace the current Horizon 2020.

Slow Food Europe Among Organizations Against Reopening Trade Negotiations with the US

Just days before the EU trade ministers decide whether to give the mandate to the European Commission to reopen formal negotiations on a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) agreement, Slow Food Europe joins a group of organizations to urge decision-makers to uphold the Paris Agreement and not mandate new trade negotiations with the United States.

European Citizens’ Initiative “End the Cage Age” at Halfway Point with 500,000 Signatures Collected in the Biggest Political Push for Animal Welfare

500,000 citizens of the European Union have signed the European Citizens Initiative (ECI) “End the Cage Age” launched in September last year. This marks the halfway point in the campaign. Slow Food is among 140 organizations strongly involved in supporting the ECI, which aims to end the use of cages for farm animals across the continent.

Civil Society on the Reflection Paper on a Sustainable Europe by 2030: Drastic Changes Are Needed, Good Intentions Are Not Enough

Slow Food Europe believes food-related issues should have been more broadly addressed in the European Commission’s Reflection Paper on a Sustainable Europe by 2030 since food can be a way to help achieve each of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) set by the United Nations. Meanwhile, in a public debate held at the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) on February 12, civil society groups criticized the European Commission for portraying the European Union as a frontrunner in sustainable development. The Reflection Paper, published at the end of January, focuses on the key policy foundations for the transition towards a sustainable Europe, including the aim of correcting the imbalances in our food system.

A Common Food Policy for Europe Unveiled by IPES Food: Slow Food Among the Contributors to the Process

“A Common Food Policy for Europe is urgently needed to address climate change, halt biodiversity loss, curb obesity, and making farming reliable for the next generation.” This was the key message of a report launched today by the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems (IPES-Food), following a three-year process of participatory research. Slow Food was among 400 food system actors who helped to shape a blueprint for a reform, which was presented at the high-level meeting at the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC).

Slow Food Worried about Newly Adopted Decisions on Marine Environments

This week in Brussels, Belgium and Dubrovnik, Croatia, two decisions were made, which will cause great concern for the future of the sea and fish populations. On Monday, EU ministers of agriculture and fisheries decided on catch limits for economically relevant deep-sea fish stocks for 2019 and 2020, while the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) increased the authorized catch quotas of bluefin tuna by 20%. Slow Food is concerned that by favoring the interests of various players in the market, marine ecosystems are put at risk.

100,000 EU citizens call on EU agriculture ministers to serve up better future for farming

Brussels, November 19 – the Good Food Good Farming campaign organised a Disco Soup in front of the Council of the European Union today, calling on EU agriculture ministers to serve up a better future for farming. The campaign, made up of over 80 civil society groups, representing farmers, food activists, and environmental organizations, drew attention to the ongoing reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and delivered 100,000 signatures of EU citizens, supporting demands for a fair, green and healthy CAP reform. The Disco Soup – a culinary and musical act of protest – was the final event of the European Days of Action which have brought together thousands of people across the EU.

Slow Food joins Organizations Calling on the European Ombudsman to Assess Actions of the European Commission in the case of electric fishing

Slow Food has joined 30 civil society groups calling on the European Commission to ultimately stop electric fishing. Despite being banned in the EU, this fishing method is still practiced in Europe, with one of the most notable cases of the Netherlands. The research, carried out by Bloom association, reveals the extent of lobbying and the public subsidies granted to industrial electric trawlers, going against public interest and regulatory framework. The results of the research were disclosed today at the press conference in the European Parliament.